IPWEA SA Excellence Awards - Winners 2015


Excellence in Design and/or Construction of a Public Works Project - Civil Under $1 million

WINNER: Phil Boulden (City of Onkparinga)
PROJECT: Southport Boardwalk Upgrade Port Noarlunga South

Excellence in Design and/or Construction of a Public Works Project - Civil Over $1 million

WINNER: Danielle Gevers (City of Onkaparinga)
PROJECT: Happy Valley Sports Park

HIGH COMMENDATION:
Kellogg. Brown & Root (KBR)
PROJECT:
Southern Expressway Duplication - Adelaide

Excellence in Design and/or Construction of a Public Works Project - Water Under $1 million

(no winner – commendation only)
HIGH COMMENDATION: Erin Gillespie (District Council of Mt Barker)
PROJECT: Littlehampton Effluent Gravity Main Upgrade Stage 2

Excellence in Design and/or Construction of a Public Works Project - Water Over $1 million

WINNER: Catherine Brock (Tonkin Consulting/Leed Engineering)
PROJECT: Capelli Road Wastewater Pump Station

Excellence in Road Safety Engineering

WINNER: Chris Dunn (GHD and City of Marion)
PROJECT: Shared space – Ragamuffin Drive, Hallett Cove

COMMENDATION:
SA Government (The Department of Planning, Transport & Infrastructure)
PROJECT: Median Wire Rope Safety Barrier – Main North Road

Excellence in Design and/or Construction of a Public Works Environmental Enhancement Project or Initiative which includes an Open Space and/or Community Facility

WINNER:
Brian Fitzpatrick (City of Onkaparinga)
PROJECT: Frank Hilton Reserve Landfill remediation and upgrade

Excellence in the Sustainable Solutions in Public Works

WINNER: David Bendo and Peter Levett (City of Salisbury and Downer Infrastructure)
PROJECT: Achieving Sustainability through the Re-Use of Toner Cartridge Waste: The City of Salisbury Experience

HIGH COMMENDATION:
City of Charles Sturt
PROJECT: Restoration, Repairs and upgrade of the Sir William Goodman Bridge.

Excellence in Asset Management Projects and Practice

WINNER: Thornton Harfield (City of Tea Tree Gully)
PROJECT: Managing our Stormwater Assets Project

Emerging Leader/Individual Commitment to Local Excellence in Public Works Management

WINNER: Matthew Sanderson (City of Unley)

Professional of the Year/Public Works Leader

WINNER: Giuseppe (Joe) La Spina (Wallbridge and Gilbert Consulting)

IPWEA SA GV Allen Medal

WINNER: Kwan Sie Tse (Student - Uni SA)


AWARD 1
Excellence in Design and/or Construction of a Public Works Project - Civil Under $1 million


Druids Avenue and Cameron Road Roundabout, Mount Barker
District Council of Mt Barker


Council’s Transport Master Plan (2009) identified the need to upgrade the busy 4 way intersection managed with Stop and Give Way signs at Druids Avenue and Cameron Road.

This key town centre intersection experiences peak periods for drop off and pick up at the nearby school and accommodates a combination of passenger vehicles, buses (including 18m long articulated buses), commercial vehicles and caravans.

In August 2013 an interim small roundabout (fully mountable) was installed aimed at easing traffic flow around the town centre during the nearby Morphett Hutchinson Precinct Upgrade works. The interim roundabout was only approved by DPTI on the understanding that it would be replaced by a permanent roundabout in the near future. An upgrade to stormwater, pedestrian linkages and landscaping were also incorporated.

Completion of the permanent roundabout has further improved the safety of the intersection by including wider turn paths for commercial vehicle and a fully mountable annulus.

Southport Boardwalk Upgrade Port Noarlunga South

City of Onkaparinga

This innovative project provides a disabled access walkway and new utility services to the South Port Surf Life Saving Club. It is also able to carry a motorised stretcher for emergency evacuations. To protect the new structure from erosion, deep screw pile footings were installed into the sand dunes.

Design and construction project management was undertaken by the City of Onkaparinga. ‘GHD Engineering’ did the detailed design including an environmental management plan and archaeological scoping study.

‘Meinhardt Engineering’ was engaged for the utility services and lighting design.

A quality finish was achieved by the principle construction contractors, ‘Blubuilt’.

Due to the environmental and cultural sensitivities the project had to be delivered within a narrow construction corridor. This was achieved on budget with minimal inconvenience to the club members or public.

The new boardwalk demonstrates excellence in design and construction through provision of a wide DDA compliant access and new utility services while ensuring protection for local flora and fauna in the adjacent Port Noarlunga sand dunes.


AWARD 2 Excellence in Design and/or Construction of a Public Works Project - Civil Over $1 million

Restoration, Repairs and upgrade of the Sir William Goodman Bridge
City of Charles Sturt


In 1908 the Metropolitan Tramways Trust (MTT) expanded its network into western Adelaide. The expansion included a bridge across the River Torrens between Holland Street Thebarton and Manton Street Hindmarsh. The MTT general manager was William Goodman.

The bridge is an early example of a steel reinforced concrete bridge designed by John Monash. The current owners are the Cities of West Torrens and Charles Sturt.

The City of Charles Sturt decided to restore the State Heritage listed bridge for $2.3M. The restoration included removing spalled concrete, rusted reinforcement and bitumen, fixing new reinforcement, pouring low strength cement, wrapping beams in fibre blankets, applying a waterproof membrane and a paint sealant; and rip-rap. The bridge now meets bridge and concrete standards.

The restoration is sympathetic to the heritage of the bridge, and included new handrails, symbolic tram tracks, decorative LED lights, and public lighting. The bridge was reopened in September 2014

Southern Expressway Duplication
Kellogg Brown & Root Pty Ltd (KBR)


Within the Southern Expressway Duplication, KBR has delivered upon the challenge of providing the detailed design to change the expressway operation from a reversible single carriageway to a dual carriageway. Key design considerations included completion according to a schedule of bridge closures, service relocations and rock blasting.

The design incorporated innovative solutions including temporary works for extended bridges and enhancements in road geometry. KBR adapted the design to incorporate existing services, to open up abutments with spill-throughs, and to use butterfly signage.

To minimise the carbon footprint, permanent stockpiles prevented surplus material going off-site. Additionally, existing spans of the pedestrian bridges were reused over the new carriageway. Jet grouting was also used at altered reinforced soil walls to reduce waste.

Working within a delivery team including DPTI and Lend Lease, KBR’s design has realized a number of key benefits to the community including improved safety, reduced travel times, and enhanced economic development opportunities.

Happy Valley Sports Park
City of Onkaparinga

The Happy Valley Sport Park Redevelopment refreshed and reinvigorated an existing sports park to ensure it continues to meet changing community and sporting group needs. It did this through demonstration of best practise in planning, design, community engagement and construction and was completed in November 2014.

Significant improvements included a new international standard tennis clubroom and court facilities, shared use path network and popular children’s playground and supporting facilities. This highly successful project has resulted in increased local community and club participation in sport and recreation attracting between 750 and 800 users a week.

Its successes also include attraction of international tennis tournaments including the recent 2015 ATP Challenger that forms part of the ATP World Tour and were a lead in event to the 2015 Australian Open Grand Slam. The tournament featured top 100 tennis players including former world no 8 Marcos Baghdatis and attracted over 3500 people a day to the sports park.

This $3.7M project was delivered by the City of Onkaparinga with funding support from the Happy Valley Tennis Club and Department for Planning and Local Government.

AWARD 3
Excellence in Design and/or Construction of a Public Works Project - Water Under $1 million


Littlehampton Effluent Gravity Main Upgrade Stage 2
District Council of Mt Barker


Littlehampton is serviced by a wastewater trunk main that runs through the sporting complex Anembo Park, under the South Eastern Freeway via the creek culvert, along Littlehampton and Mount Barker creeks to the wastewater treatment plant in Mount Barker.

To cater for growth, increased capacity was required in this main. Problems were also experienced in storm events with damage received from flood waters and debris.

An alternative route was identified, bypassing the creek culvert to avoid any exposed pipe areas, travelling under the BMX track at Anembo Park and the South Eastern Freeway, to connect back into the existing line at the rear of Cornerstone College at the other side of the freeway.

The terrain along the new route and the depth of the pipe under the freeway section (approximately 17 metres down) required an innovative solution and directional drilling technology was used to avoid deep excavation especially across the freeway.

Drilling Industry publications indicate that this installation is the longest at grade (minimum 1% fall) drill using 355mm outside diameter (OD) pipe in Australia. An achievement for SA Directional Boring and Council.

AWARD 4
Excellence in Design and/or Construction of a Public Works Project - Water Over $1 million


Water Proofing Unley – capture and reuse and recycled water initiatives
City of Unley


From 2009 through until 2012, strict water restrictions were in place in South Australia as a result of on-going drought. Throughout summer, most of the City of Unley’s parks and reserve turf was close to brown by February.

Trees within parks became highly stressed as they struggled to survive without the water from irrigation systems.

The community demanded that we not work outside of the same guidelines that are provided to them.

Noting the deterioration of limited open space, the City of Unley embraced a vision of ‘Resource Innovation’ whereby the City’s water resources are harnessed and reliance on potable / mains water and the River Murray for irrigation is minimised.

With this Vision and goals that included” to return to pre water restriction open space standards using sustainable water supply” and “to reduce reliance on mains water whilst maintaining open space service standards” , Unley’s commitment to “Waterproofing the East” took shape.

Unley’s comprehensive water sustainability program included the investigation, development and implementation of projects utilising recycled water from the Glenelg to Adelaide pipeline, Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR - now Managed Aquifer Recharge and localised stormwater harvesting and reuse.

Capelli Road Wastewater Pump Station
Tonkin Consulting/Leed Engineering


The Capelli Road Waterwater Pump Station (WWPS) was passed its design life and at risk of structural failure due to prolonged exposure to hydrogen sulphide gas.

SA Water Corporation decided that a complete replacement was the preferred option and engaged Leed Engineering & Construction to design and construct the new pump station. Tonkin Consulting was engaged by Leed to be the lead designer.

During the tender process Tonkin Consulting identified an alternative method of construction for the wet well shaft that delivered significant cost and time benefits to the project. The alternative method used segmented caisson shafts instead of secant piling.

The existing pump station was required to continue operating throughout construction and no operational issues occurred as a result of construction activities. The new Capelli Road WWPS had increased pumping capacity and redundancy and was delivered one month ahead of schedule and under budget.

AWARD 5
Excellence in Road Safety Engineering


Morphett Hutchinson Streets Precinct Upgrade
District Council of Mt Barker


In 2012, the Mount Barker Town Centre Strategy proposed treatment options for the Morphett Hutchinson Precinct including creating a pleasant and attractive setting for people to spend time in which reinforced the character and heritage of the past and builds the character and heritage of the future.

Located in the centre of the township, the project identified the need to improve the operation and safety of the intersection by changing the priority, improve pedestrian connectivity throughout the precinct and to other areas of the township, improve the streetscape and amenity through improved urban design elements including a plaza area, additional trees, landscaping, arbours, seating, a water feature and public art.

Construction for the reprioritised intersection, kerbing, stormwater drainage and the four pedestrian crossings were completed while design for streetscaping was fast-tracked to enable the civil work to be immediately followed by the streetscape.

The streetscaping included new footpaths, paved plaza, bluestone seating walls, artistic screenings, steel arbours, bus shelters. Innovation Water Sensitive urban design in the form of kerbing and tree pit inlets was incorporated harvesting stormwater to irrigate garden beds and trees.

Wire Rope Safety Barrier – Main North Road
Department of Planning, Transport and Infrastructure


This is the first installation of continuous wire rope safety barrier in the median of an existing high speed outer urban four-lane divided road in South Australia.

The key objective is to prevent fatal and serious injury crashes, consistent with South Australia’s Road Safety Strategy 2020 – Towards Zero Together and Safe System principles.

This section of Main North Road, between Curtis Road and Tiver Road, was selected based on the high incidence of runoff road crashes with trees in the median. Total project cost was approximately $1.3 million and construction was completed in June 2014.

Treatments of wire rope will continue to be considered at further locations. Project success is due to the collaborative effort of all parties involved; initiated and led by the Safety Strategy Section of DPTI.

Shared space – Ragamuffin Drive, Hallett Cove
GHD and City of Marion


The City of Marion in conjunction with GHD saw an opportunity to transform a normal street designed for cars, into a shared space by design for all users. The road was viewed as not just a physical element of the urban/suburban landscape but a space for social exchange, inviting to users and (where appropriate) encouraging people to stay.

While Ragamuffin Drive was designed to complement the new Hallett Cove Civil Centre, the main features of the road include:

• Raised single level pavement surface (no kerb and water table);
• Various pavement treatments (asphalt, concrete and pavers);
• 90 degree parking; and
• The application of Water Sensitive Urban Design.

As a consequence the road no longer has clearly defined areas for the car or the pedestrians, but a shared space for all modes. This is expected to create a lower speed and therefore safer environment.

To measure the benefits of the design of Ragamuffin Drive an assessment strategy has been devised to ascertain the movement of traffic, behavioural changes and levels of comfort within the community.

AWARD 6
Excellence in Design and/or Construction of a Public Works Environmental Enhancement Project or Initiative which includes an Open Space and/or Community Facility


Salisbury Civic Square
City of Salisbury


The Salisbury Civic Square project is a primary component of the Salisbury City Centre Renewal Strategy which has aimed to reactivate the space to be a destination for locals and provide a variety of reasons to spend time within the town centre.

For visitors, the Square and its ability to host community events is to be a reason to come to Salisbury.

Users of the square were categorised as ‘lunch break’, ‘child and parent’, ‘youth’, ‘night-time’, and ‘visitor’ and their needs were addressed.

Of particular significance in the reactivation of the Square has been its greening, and provisions for active and passive recreation.

Measurement of the success of the Civic Square project is linked to activity. People are lingering, families are in evidence, people are attending to enjoy work breaks, people meet at the ‘Square’. It is being used around the year. All ages are present. More visitors are present.

Anderson Court Outback Adventure Park
Campbelltown City Council


Anderson Court Outback Adventure Park was developed based on the Five E’s; Environment, Eco-Friendly, Explore, Educate and Excite.

It has incorporated a maze, a unique tree hut, native animal life size sculptures, a bush tucker garden, fossil finding elements and other play features into a small but prominent Council reserve.

The Outback Adventure Park provides a variety of different play and learning environments suitable for children of all ages and abilities. The wide range of natural and constructed play opportunities meet children’s needs for challenge, excitement and exploration while allowing for environmental and indigenous cultural education.

The project has demonstrated innovation and excellence in play space design through the use of custom made play elements that use up to 80% of recycled materials in a unique way. All new play elements used in the park were custom designed by Staff and in consultation with children from the local Children’s centre.

Ridge Park Open Space Project
City of Unley


Ridge Park is a key open space and sporting facility within the City of Unley. It is the largest reserve in the City and contains some of the City’s most culturally significant pre-European tree species.

The scope of works for the project includes a Managed Aquifer Recharge Scheme, a flood control dam and various innovative recreational upgrades including natural playspace areas and an outdoor fitness equipment loop. The upgrades at Ridge Park were aimed to improve an already successful space by increasing passive and active recreational areas, expanding biodiversity within the reserve, protecting the city from flood damage and capturing water for reuse on many of the City’s reserves.

Extensive and innovative community engagement tools were utilised to assist in development of the plan.

The project’s main challenges were the integration of various components into an established reserve without compromising existing facilities and protection of the remnant vegetation.

The Solomontown Beach Plaza
Port Pirie Regional Council


The Solomontown Beach Plaza project was the result of a number of years of Council work that commenced in November 2011 and involved extensive community and stakeholder consultation, the adoption of a vision for the wider area and the creation of a master plan and subsequent detailed design for a new community owned public space.

A major design principle adopted in the design of the Plaza was to create a public space that will not only function efficiently, but will also be viewed as an inviting and attractive space for people to use and interact with. By creating a space with a high level of visual presentation, the Plaza will not only function as required, but will also become a key destination space along Main Road, as well as becoming a key entry point to the Solomontown Beach Precinct.

This project received funding under the State Government’s People for Places Program.

In March 2014, the Port Pirie Regional Council completed the construction of the Solomontown Beach Plaza.

Ferries McDonald Redevelopment project
The Rural City of Murray Bridge


The Ferries McDonald Redevelopment project was part of the strategic transport link for freight from Langhorne Creek to the Barossa Valley. Ferries McDonald Road is located approximately 10 km south-west of Murray Bridge.

The project was to redevelop and seal the existing Ferries McDonald Road to Austroads B Double standards whilst minimising the environmental impact on roadside native vegetation and protect the Malleefowl population during and post construction of the road.

Issues included redeveloping the existing road which passes through the Ferries McDonald Conservation Park and travels adjacent to the Monarto Conservation Park. There is an existing but small population of vulnerably listed Malleefowl in the area, and a population of Resin Wattle which are an endangered plant species.

Mitigation measures where put in place to minimise the impact of the redevelopment on the Malleefowl population and the roadside native vegetation. These mitigation measures were successful and have transferability to other Council projects and to other Councils.

Morphett Hutchinson Streets Precinct Upgrade
District Council of Mt Barker


In 2012, the Mount Barker Town Centre Strategy proposed treatment options for the Morphett Hutchinson Precinct including creating a pleasant and attractive setting for people to spend time in which reinforced the character and heritage of the past and builds the character and heritage of the future.

Located in the centre of the township, the project identified the need to improve the operation and safety of the intersection by changing the priority, improve pedestrian connectivity throughout the precinct and to other areas of the township, improve the streetscape and amenity through improved urban design elements including a plaza area, additional trees, landscaping, arbours, seating, a water feature and public art.

Construction for the reprioritised intersection, kerbing, stormwater drainage and the four pedestrian crossings were completed while design for streetscaping was fast-tracked to enable the civil work to be immediately followed by the streetscape.

The streetscaping included new footpaths, paved plaza, bluestone seating walls, artistic screenings, steel arbours, bus shelters.

Innovation Water Sensitive urban design in the form of kerbing and tree pit inlets was incorporated harvesting stormwater to irrigate garden beds and trees.

Mawson Green, Meadows, South Australia
Greenhill – Project Lead Consultant


Mawson Green at Meadows is an intimate community development creating 200 residential allotments.

Before the development could continue solutions to aging and inadequate infrastructure were required including:

• Finding a potable water solution
• A recycled water supply consisting of treated waste water and storm water harvested from a new wetland to service both the township and the new development
• Creek rehabilitation providing enhanced amenity, water quality, re-establishment of habitat for flora and fauna and a passive recreational asset.
• A new waste water treatment plant to replace the existing council waste management system
• Upgrades to the external road network.

This project is a demonstration of a collaborative approach between all stakeholders resulting in implementation of innovative solutions that successfully meet environmental objectives.

The project has improved the sustainability of existing public infrastructure as well as providing new solutions that benefit not only the new residents but the wider Meadows Community.

Frank Hilton Reserve Landfill remediation and upgrade
City of Onkaparinga


The Frank Hilton Reserve is the largest project designed and constructed by City of Onkaparinga staff, showcasing staff capability to deliver such a significant, complex, large scale project.

This project took a former landfill site with a non-engineered cap, ongoing drainage issues, failing infrastructure and limited recreational facilities and created a truly iconic reserve, fronting one of South Australia’s most picturesque stretches of coastline.

The Frank Hilton reserve remediation involved installation of an engineered landfill cap, significantly upgraded stormwater and outfall structures, and new reserve including a new playground, fitness equipment, shade sails, picnic facilities, landscaping and irrigated turf.

The project was designed and fully funded by the City of Onkaparinga.

Working in collaboration with the local community, the project demonstrates best practice in planning, innovative engineering and sustainable design solutions to manage complex environmental issues whilst demonstrating substantial cost savings to the community.

AWARD 7
Excellence in the Sustainable Solutions in Public Works


Second Tier Greening of Unley for a Sustainable Environment
City of Unley

Unley City Council currently has approximately 26,000 Council owned trees within the local government area of 14 square kilometres. Trees constitute an important element of the rich cultural heritage of Unley and a considerable asset to the community on many levels.

Water restrictions have had a significant impact on the long-term survival of the street tree asset within the City. A key to the tree’s survival is improving the growing medium near the tree to ensure maximum moisture retention. A further important ingredient identified is the need to draw on the community through resident and property owner engagement.

The Second Tier Greening of Unley for a Sustainable Environment program provides incentives for the community to assist Council in planting up ‘their’ nature strip and thereby improving the growing medium near the street tree and ultimately supporting street tree survival.

To encourage and promote the selection of loam for nature strips and the subsequent planting of the nature strip, the Council developed a range of promotional material and incentives for residents and property owners.

Restoration, Repairs and upgrade of the Sir William Goodman Bridge
City of Charles Sturt


In 1908 the Metropolitan Tramways Trust (MTT) expanded its network into western Adelaide. The expansion included a bridge across the River Torrens between Holland Street Thebarton and Manton Street Hindmarsh. The MTT general manager was William Goodman.

The bridge is an early example of a steel reinforced concrete bridge designed by John Monash. The current owners are the Cities of West Torrens and Charles Sturt.

The City of Charles Sturt decided to restore the State Heritage listed bridge for $2.3M. The restoration included removing spalled concrete, rusted reinforcement and bitumen, fixing new reinforcement, pouring low strength cement, wrapping beams in fibre blankets, applying a waterproof membrane and a paint sealant; and rip-rap. The bridge now meets bridge and concrete standards.

The restoration is sympathetic to the heritage of the bridge, and included new handrails, symbolic tram tracks, decorative LED lights, and public lighting.

The bridge was reopened in September 2014.

Littlehampton Effluent Gravity Main Upgrade Stage 2
District Council of Mt Barker


Littlehampton is serviced by a wastewater trunk main that runs through the sporting complex Anembo Park, under the South Eastern Freeway via the creek culvert, along Littlehampton and Mount Barker creeks to the wastewater treatment plant in Mount Barker.

To cater for growth, increased capacity was required in this main. Problems were also experienced in storm events with damage received from flood waters and debris.

An alternative route was identified, bypassing the creek culvert to avoid any exposed pipe areas, travelling under the BMX track at Anembo Park and the South Eastern Freeway, to connect back into the existing line at the rear of Cornerstone College at the other side of the freeway.

The terrain along the new route and the depth of the pipe under the freeway section (approximately 17 metres down) required an innovative solution and directional drilling technology was used to avoid deep excavation especially across the freeway.

Drilling Industry publications indicate that this installation is the longest at grade (minimum 1% fall) drill using 355mm outside diameter (OD) pipe in Australia. An achievement for SA Directional Boring and Council.

Achieving Sustainability through the Re-Use of Toner Cartridge Waste: The City of Salisbury Experience
City of Salisbury and Downer Infrastructure


There has been considerable work in the area of reducing consumer waste generated from our ever increasing technological footprint. One such area is that of the waste products generated from the photocopy industry.

Whilst there had been a small amount of research and development from the USA in use of waste toner powder in asphalt, the technology had never been commercialised. This concept was re-invigorated through an Australian company, Close the Loop and by working in partnership with Downer, jointly developed a product that improved the performance of asphalt.

TonerPave™, a hot mixed asphalt incorporating processed waste toner has been developed through customer support and internal commitment provides enhanced properties whilst aligning with sustainability strategies of Councils such as the City of Salisbury.

Tonerpave utilisation in the City of Salisbury has accounted for at least the annual re-use of toner waste from all sources within the City into asphalt.

The benefits in the re- use of products that would potentially end up as landfill is alone of value to the community, but where particular products can be enhanced by these recycled products could be seen as a holy grail.

AWARD 8
Excellence in Asset Management Projects and Practice


Managing our Stormwater Assets Project
City of Tea Tree Gully


The Managing our Stormwater Assets project commenced in 2014 as part of the broader MACK or ‘Managing Assets through Capability and Knowledge’ program which has the following objectives:

• embed a culture of Asset Management continuous improvement within the organisation
• increase the relevance of services provided to the community
• empower staff to drive change
• provide staff with a consistent approach to reviewing services and service standards
• improve community satisfaction with Council and its service delivery
• identify and implement sustainable cost savings

The Managing our Stormwater Assets project allowed the 12 staff in the Drainage Maintenance team to view and collect data electronically in the field during inspection and maintenance works. This removed intensive manual paper based processes and allowed accurate and reliable data to be analysed for the development of future maintenance and renewal programs and to inform the Long Term Financial Plan.

The success of this project in a relatively short time period has now been recognised with further implementations across Council’s core assets now being planned, including the footpaths and playground maintenance teams.

Prospect Whole of Life Works
Tonkin Consulting and City of Prospect


The City of Prospect’s Whole of Life Works project is the culmination of decades of diligent data collection and analysis.

The City of Prospect and Tonkin Consulting have had a long history of collaborating to improve the management of the Council’s road and pavement assets. The two organisations have worked together since the late 1980s to develop a detailed and accurate register that provides over 20 years’ worth of historical data. In 2012 the Council embarked on a project to establish the lowest ‘whole of life’ cost for road surface renewal planning and road surface asset accounting.

A whole of life analysis was undertaken in a model over a 100 year period to find the most cost-effective solutions to renew surfaces and pavements.

The project has helped the City of Prospect to articulate a road management philosophy to minimise annual depreciation and assign treatment costs over 20 years’ funding projection, driving a sustainable approach to road network management.

Sustainable Management of delivery of services
City of West Torrens


To ensure that the City of West Torrens manages its building assets in a manner most appropriate for its community, Council undertook a property review process in 2006.

The recommendations of the review were based on creating a network of multi-purpose community facilities and neighbourhood centres strategically located across the City.

Since 2006, the proceeds of property sales have facilitated the development of Council's first community hub site at Kings Reserve, namely the Thebarton Community Centre. Also, Council continues to plan for the development of community hubs to provide multipurpose community facilities such as Camden and Lockleys Ovals.

The current report updates the initial review and is underpinned by a building condition audit, each property’s capacity and utilisation and valuations.

The key objective of the process is to provide updated, relevant and necessary background information to enable Council to make well-reasoned and informed decisions in regard to its property portfolio.

Emerging Leader/Individual Commitment to Local Excellence in Public Works Management

Our 2015 Emerging Leader graduated from Adelaide University with a Bachelor of Civil and Structural Engineering with an honours first class.

He commenced his career at Tonkin Consulting where he worked on numerous projects undertaking design, the preparation of specifications and associated tender documentation for the construction of civil works.

In August 2013 he moved jobs to gain more experience developing and delivering numerous and varied renewal and capital projects of varying scale and complexity. He has demonstrated high level of skills in the technical area, project management and problem solving, while delivering varied and sometimes challenging projects.

He has been responsible for major redevelopment of reserves, supervision of the design and construction of a major WSUD project, installation of traffic control devices, replacement of pedestrian footbridges and the development of Aquifer Storage and Recharge sites. He is always keen to take on new and challenging opportunities, investigate new technologies and assist others including Young IPWEA. He recently got married and has a German shepherd puppy which is destroying everything in sight.

The development of all these important skills has enabled him to grow into a more experienced professional engineer and become a key member of the Assets and Environment Team at the City of Unley.

Professional of the Year/Public Works Leader

The Public Leader of the Year is a leader in his field, and is highly regarded in the industry. He is held in high esteem by his peers in Councils in South Australia.

He has over 20 years civil and environmental engineering experience on a wide range of civil infrastructure and storm water management projects.

He has expertise in the design of innovative water sensitive urban design (WSUD) systems, wetlands, watercourse restoration and erosion control projects, sustainable water management practices, infiltration systems, erosion and sediment control, and conventional storm water management systems.

He has acquired extensive experience on Brownfield and Greenfield sites including urban and commercial development, public realm design projects and spaces, civil and environmental projects, as well as earthworks and civil works design.

His innovative work in environmental storm water management has been recognised with several state and national awards. He is an active participant in IPWEA SA events and encourages his staff to also be active members of the South Australian division.


IPWEA SA GV Allen Medal

WINNER: Kwan Sie Tse – Student UniSA

Awarded to the student in the Bachelor of Engineering (Civil) or associated specialisations for achieving the best overall performance in the courses Mechanics of Materials, Road Design and Traffic Management, Geospatial Science for Engineers and Introduction to Water Engineering (completed in the same year).