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Historical Asset Data - Do you record it?

  • 1.  Historical Asset Data - Do you record it?

    Posted 10 days ago
    Hi everyone,

    I'm after some comments regarding the recording and use of historical asset data.  Example below (footpath renewal/upgrade excluding details like cross overs and pram ramps for simplicity):

    • Works = Entire footpath segment between Intersection A and B is replaced (existing slabs removed and replaced with insitu concrete, plus widened from 1.2 to 1.5m).
    • Asset Data = Update footpath record between Intersection A and B (update new installation data, condition, material type, width and review unit rate, useful life).
    Software I've used in the past has been able to reflect this new/current asset data plus archived the previous asset data.  The software I'm working with presently shows the new/current asset data but does not have the functionality for maintaining the previous asset data (not easily anyway).

    Questions:

    1. Is maintaining the previous asset data critical?
    2. If so, why?

    Thanks for any of your thoughts!


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    Jason Teh
    Town of Claremont
    Asset Management Officer
    CLAREMONT
    Australia
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    Pathway


  • 2.  RE: Historical Asset Data - Do you record it?

    Posted 9 days ago
    Hey Jason, here in Newmarket we also don't maintain archives of our asset registry. As a municipality, we have encountered issues where having the archives would be nice. In many cases where we report future forecasted trends, questions about what came before us are asked. While we have a robust GIS, the role of an asset registry is not fully understood. We will be looking to eventually archive our asset registry but its fairly far out on the improvements roadmap due to more pressing items. Here are some of the use cases I have seen for maintaining previous asset data:

    1. Extent of the asset portfolio - is your asset portfolio growing or shrinking, and how does this compare to historical levels? We had GIS for many years but did not report asset quantities through AM plans.
    2. Lifecycle activities and assumptions - often, assumptions are made about "X" years of expected service life or similar. Does this actually manifest in practice? If you simply overwrite your asset with a new one when it is replaced, you wont know.
    3. Asset characteristics - how were they different in the past compared to today? Right now we have about 90 kilometers of cast iron and ductile iron that we wish to eventually replace with PVC. However, it is unclear how close 90 km was to the peak of the irons being in operation. Have we already replaced a lot or is most of it still around? If we knew this, could it form how long it will take to replace everything with current practice?

    These are a few examples, I'm sure you can think of others. Since you're like us its difficult to get this information now, but if you aren't going to archive your asset data you may wish to start developing some KPIs that reflect historical context. There are many other types of measurement outside the asset registry that you will need to look back on in future years as well. If you start recording them now within a few years you will start to build a history.

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    Erik Wright
    Town of Newmarket
    Asset Management Specialist
    Richmond Hill ON
    Canada
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  • 3.  RE: Historical Asset Data - Do you record it?

    Posted 9 days ago
    Hello,
    What you have described is creation of a new asset that should have its own record that commences from the date first used. The record for the item that was replaced should be a separate asset record with disposal date nominated. While they may have the same "name", they are different assets.

    Having the historic details available (for the disposed asset) and separate from this new asset is very important.
    The historic information gives some means to predict the behavior of similar footpaths that were constructed at around the same time, helping feed into your renewals modelling.
    The historic information should also have some details of maintenance and repairs that have been done, helping feed into your maintenance program. Especially for "older" footpaths.
    The historic information will provide some indication/confirmation of useful life details to enable verification of the financial modelling (depreciation over the asset lifecycle) and the renewal modelling for future budgets.
    The historic details will in the case described also provide clarity that the LOS was only 1.2m wide compared to now 1.5m wide. Thus if there were incidents/accidents relating to footpath width, a risk assessment is possible considering the new width compared to the previous.

    I would not be updating the record for the footpath section described, but creating a brand new asset number for that.

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    Lance Scriven
    Dubbo Regional Council
    Corporate Asset specialist
    DUBBO
    Australia
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  • 4.  RE: Historical Asset Data - Do you record it?

    Posted 9 days ago
    Hi Everyone,  I find keeping historical asset data is usefulfor understanding performance history but also have found through using SAP PM and now MRI RAM I have to find a way of keeping it so that it is easy to filter out and see the current asset base.  I've either used a field that shows active or obsolete or created a completely separate 'Scrap' location to move the old asset to and added info into the description.
    Maintaining previous asset data helps with determining if improvements made in design or maintenance of current assets are resulting in extension of life.


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    Fiona Mackay
    Flow Systems
    Asset Manager
    Sydney
    Australia
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  • 5.  RE: Historical Asset Data - Do you record it?

    Posted 9 days ago
    Hi Jason,
    I would recommend holding historic treatment and condition data.  It's invaluable if you want to build trend analysis to understand asset behaviour and develop predictive modelling.  It's also useful when trialing new materials or processes to determine how well performance matches expectation.
    Regards,
    Simon Burrows

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    Simon Burrows
    Principal Asset Manager
    AECOM
    United Kingdom
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  • 6.  RE: Historical Asset Data - Do you record it?

    Posted 5 days ago
    Hi everyone,

    I really appreciate all the detailed responses with useful points provided.

    We are not quite at those levels of AM maturity within my organisation, but I agree that shouldn't stop us collecting and building up this data so that it in the future it can be utilised in the ways suggested.

    I'll share these points within my team to work out our priority with having this incorporated into our current setup.

    Thank you again for your time.

    Kind regards,


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    Jason Teh
    Town of Claremont
    Asset Management Officer
    CLAREMONT
    Australia
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  • 7.  RE: Historical Asset Data - Do you record it?

    Posted 5 days ago
    Hi Jason,

    In addition to the excellent points already raised, the retirement of an asset and the creation of a new asset record is paramount to undertaking temporal analysis (as mention above - material performance, what did it look like 10 years ago, etc).  Revising an existing asset record with the data for a replacement asset erases all ability to perform advanced metrics leaving with only a Point in Time (PIT) snapshot.  Useful for some analysis but wholly lacking for understanding the fundamental picture and undertaking process and material improvements.
    If your current system does not permit archiving and reverse PIT, you may need to manage the records in your underlying GIS e.g. have an archive table or feature class to store retired assets.  This will allow you to reconstruct what an area looked like at a certain date.  Very useful for historical analysis, claim management, performance studies, etc.

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    Dave Salter
    Region of Niagara
    Manager, Transportation Asset Management
    Thorold ON
    Canada
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  • 8.  RE: Historical Asset Data - Do you record it?

    Posted 3 days ago
    Hi Jason,

    I agree with comments above that the old asset record is retained, and a new asset record is created, so that the asset records are unique.  The key is to ensure that a status field is available, e.g. old asset has 'disposed' status and new asset has 'commissioned. status.  This should be a capability even in the most basic systems.

    My top 2 practical recommendations for keeping the unique records:
    1. Work history - distinguish work history between old assets and new assets, including old vs new inspections, old vs new defects, and old vs new repairs.  This is very useful in responding to insurance claims and legal matters.
    2. Useful life - old assets have a recorded 'commission' date and 'disposal' date, thus a defined life.  This is very useful for asset useful life reviews.

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    Jamie Milner
    Bayside Council
    Coordinator Asset Systems
    Rockdale
    Australia
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