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  • 1.  Physical Condition Assessment Practices for Water Utilities Assets

    Posted 4 days ago

    Hi all,
    I am looking for practices and suggestions on estimating / performing a Physical Condition Assessments in Water Treatment Plants, Pump Stations and buried Pipelines.

    I need to do an "initial" physical assessment, we don't have reliable historical data for a model, this will be part of our asset management system implementation.

    Are there any "quick estimation" guidelines that takes into account asset years of age and rate of incidents/year as a factor for estimation?

    For Buried Pipelines specifically, anyone using estimation practices taking into account factors as: pipeline age, diameter, water pressure and pipe material, or historical leaks to sort of estimate the pipes are (or can be classified as) in Very Good, Good, Fair or Poor, Very Poor condition?

    For the ones using a more accurate approach and proactive actions - what kind of models and technology do you guys use for your condition assessments?

    (P.S. We are in the very early stages of asset management system implementation)

    Thanks,
    Rence



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    Rence Rincones
    SaskWater
    Manager, Asset Management
    Moose Jaw SK
    Canada
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    Pathway


  • 2.  RE: Physical Condition Assessment Practices for Water Utilities Assets

    Posted 3 days ago
    HI All, I'm intersted in any information that can be shared in this area as well.  Our water assets are young but it's time to start assesing their condition.

    Thanks,
    Fiona

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    Fiona Mackay
    Flow Systems
    Asset Manager
    Sydney
    Australia
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    Pathway


  • 3.  RE: Physical Condition Assessment Practices for Water Utilities Assets

    Posted 3 days ago
    Hi Rence,

    WSP did a desktop exercise with Central Coast Council for their buried water supply pipes. We looked at condition-related failure risk by defining likelihood and consequence scores for each pipe.

    The likelihood of condition-related failure was basically a 1-5 condition score similar to your Very Good, Good, Fair or Poor, Very Poor. This was based on pipe material and age but adjusted for diameter and operating pressure by analysing Council's break and leak history. This could be scaled back and made simple to suit whatever data is available.

    From the desktop model you can see where physical condition assessment is most valuable and should be targeted to mitigate risk. An intervention framework was developed to show this principle.

    You can see the Ozwater paper here:

    Australian Water Association (sharefile.com)
    Paper number 164

    ​Happy to chat further:
    james.thorne@wsp.com

    Kind regards,
    James

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    James Thorne
    WSP
    Christchurch
    New Zealand
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    Pathway


  • 4.  RE: Physical Condition Assessment Practices for Water Utilities Assets

    Posted 7 hours ago

    Thank you James!.  Will contact you later on to chat further.

    Thanks,

    Rence



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    Rence Rincones
    SaskWater
    Manager, Asset Management
    Moose Jaw SK
    Canada
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    Pathway


  • 5.  RE: Physical Condition Assessment Practices for Water Utilities Assets

    Posted 7 hours ago
    The IPWEA Practice Note7:  Condition Assessment & Asset Performance Guidelines for Water Supply & Sewerage are a good starting point.
    For buried assets such as pipelines it is important to build up a consistent and reliable dataset of information captured during mains failures or any opportunistic events such as cut-ins into a main.  This will help to assess trends and patterns.

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    Aneurin Hughes
    Cardno now Stantec
    Senior Principal - Asset Management
    Fortitude Valley
    Australia
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    Pathway