Road Safety Discussion

Directional arrows

  • 1.  Directional arrows

    Posted 14 October 2013 23:12
    G'day Mates

    I have an issues that most would have come across where there is one right turn deceleration & storage lane with two (2) separate accesses from this lane.

    It has been identified as a deficency in a Road Safety Audit as it could contribute to rear end crashes & the designer has left it open as a hazard as the RMS / Austroads guides do not provide for this. 

    Although not standrad practice has anyone used a right turn directional arrow with twin right tun arrowheads to indicate two separate turn locations?

    If so, has it proven successful or created more confusion (complaints/near hits/rear end crashes)

    Thanks 

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    Adam Mularczyk
    Team Co-ordinator Development Engineering
    Wyong Shire Council
    WYONG NSW

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  • 2.  RE:Directional arrows

    Posted 15 October 2013 01:29
    Hi Adam,

    When I was working in South Australia, DPTI (the State Road Authority) had such an arrow combination in their line marking manual.  This manual was revised, last year I think, and the "two headed arrow" was removed.

    You may want to talk with someone from South Australia, but my recollection is that it was not considered a "good thing".

    HTH

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    Hugh Dixon
    Traffic Engineer
    HDS Australia
    Glen Waverley VIC

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  • 3.  RE:Directional arrows

    Posted 15 October 2013 17:29
    Here in Forster we have something similar.  Leading into a roundabout we have a lane marked with 2 left turn arrow heads.  The sceanrio we have is that we have 2 roundabouts in close proximity (<100m), the first is a 2 lane roundabout and the 2nd a 1 lane roundabout for the direction of movement, there is a compulsory slip lane for the left lane at the second roundabout.  A large proportion of vehicles wish to travel through the second rounadbout.

    Because people typically keep left, we had the problem before installing the modified arrow that once they had driven through the first roundabout they were faced with a left turn arrow (into the slip lane) and no time/room to laterally shift into the right lane to enable them to pass through the second roundabout. Thus a double headed (left turn) arrow was placed before the first roundabout to advise a left turn would have to be made.  We do get some confusion from visiting motorists but have not observed or heard of any accidents resulting.



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    Stuart Small
    Projects Contracts Engineer
    Great Lakes Council
    Forster NSW

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  • 4.  RE:Directional arrows

    Posted 16 October 2013 22:29
    I have difficulty with this type of scenario when travelling in areas that are new to me and overhead advanced warning arrow signs would be a great opion if it is at all possible. They allow drivers to gain a clear understanding of the network ahead and effect a lane change accoringly well in advance rather than as a risky rushed manouver when they realise they are in the wrong lane.

    Regards,

    Murray.

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    Murray Conahan
    Asset Planner
    City of Onkaparinga
    NOARLUNGA CENTRE SAau

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